International Studies

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

GCSE 1351: Introduction to Enterprise Cybersecurity

This course will take an enterprise level holistic perspective of cybersecurity. The purpose is to explore the emerging threat landscape and the means through which organizations both private and public develop and employ various cybersecurity policies, procedures, and tactics in response. It will evaluate the various cybersecurity tools, structures, and protocols that serve as best practices within industry, by governments, and international organizations.

GCSE 4302: Cyber Ethics and the State

The course will examine the impact on human society of the rapid evolution of digital surveillance tools, artificial intelligence, internet of things, and the increase of computing power. It asks the question of whether technology should drive the course of human progress or will society engage in a value laden conversation about role of human agency in that process. Further, we will bring the question of ethics into an environment that seems to operate under its own imperative. As we are told that at some point computers and smart machines empowered through artificial intelligence will achieve self-awareness. We will look at the institutions necessary for establishing the foundations of an open dialog to determine the appropriate role for these technologies in society. The course will engage students in a debate as to whether or not we can build a technological future based on an ethical framework and if so, how we are to go about it.

GCSE 4302: Cyber Ethics and the State

The course will examine the impact on human society of the rapid evolution of digital surveillance tools, artificial intelligence, internet of things, and the increase of computing power. It asks the question of whether technology should drive the course of human progress or will society engage in a value laden conversation about role of human agency in that process. Further, we will bring the question of ethics into an environment that seems to operate under its own imperative. As we are told that at some point computers and smart machines empowered through artificial intelligence will achieve self-awareness. We will look at the institutions necessary for establishing the foundations of an open dialog to determine the appropriate role for these technologies in society. The course will engage students in a debate as to whether or not we can build a technological future based on an ethical framework and if so, how we are to go about it.

GCSE 4303: Geopolitical and Country Risk Analysis

A risk management perspective that looks at the socio-political factors that pose risks to foreign policy investments and/or business operations in foreign countries. Factors considered such as, political stability, corruption, taxation, regulatory and legal structures, regional conflicts, local economy, internal strife, and the potential for natural disaster. This analysis emphasizes not only the risk factors, but the internal decision making matrix of the political system within the target country and the impact of such decisions on the investment climate and business operations.

GCSE 4379: Cyber Warfare

This course looks at the growth and scope of cyber warfare as it impacts national power in the domains of government, diplomacy, international law, international commerce/economic power, social media/privacy, science/technology, and civil society. It traces the evolution of conflict from traditional information gathering to the development of cyber weaponry with destructive capabilities and the use of those capabilities to advance national foreign policy interests.

GCSE 4392: Independent Study

Student research on a selected problem in the field pursued under the guidance of an assigned member of the faculty.

GCSE 4399: Capstone Project in Global Cybersecurity

Capstone course in which students develop, elaborate, and research a topic of global cybersecurity. The result of this intensive research and writing exercise will be a thesis fit for presentation at a professional conference and UST Research Symposium.

GCSE 5301: Cybersecurity Program Fundamentals

The foundational course for the program will examine the overall concept of cybersecurity within a business enterprise and/or public sector organization. It will work students through the CIA Triade (Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability) which forms the basis of all network operations. In addition, the course will introduce the concept of the Threat, Vulnerability and Risk matrix and how to develop a computer system security program through the process of system auditing, threat intelligence, vulnerability assessment and risk analysis.

GCSE 5302: The Regulatory Compliance and Legal Landscape of Cybersecurity

This course will introduce students to the broad legal and regulatory framework within the digital ecosystem specifically in regards to compliance and the emerging legal landscape. Students will examine International (EU – GDPR), Federal (FISMA, Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, Presidential Policy Directives/Executive Orders) DHS - Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), State California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), Texas data Privacy and Security Act and the litigation risk exposure that comes from noncompliance. Students will explore the developing case law around lawsuits generated due to cyber breach incidents.

GCSE 5303: Organizational Resilience and Incident Response

The focal point of this course will be to develop an understanding of business continuity, and cyber incident response under an overall organizational resilience framework. First students will compare various organizational resilience frameworks NIST, ISO (International Standards Organization), BSI (British Standards Institute) and then apply one of these frameworks in a simulated environment. Then using the selected framework students will manage a cyber-breach incident and conduct an after action 'hot wash' to determine operational success or failure of the selected framework against the threat.

GCSE 5304: Managing Cybersecurity Operations

This course is focused on the day-to-day management of a cybersecurity program within an organization. After having created an organizational resilience and incident response plan, students will be directed to the operational requirements of managing an operational cybersecurity program. It will answer the question of how to coordinate with a broad spectrum of stakeholders; IT, client support, managed service providers, the application of artificial intelligence, workforce development, procurement and supply chain, internet service providers (ISP), facilities, and employee training and awareness.

GCSE 5305: Program Development and Executive Reporting

The final course in the series is where students hone their skills on “selling” their program to senior leadership at the C-Suite/Board level. A program that has been developed but is not funded or supported by senior leadership is useless. This course will focus on how to get buy-in from policy makers, secure funding through the budgetary process, locate and acquire talent, build relationships, and to prepare reports and presentations to spread the message and influence outcomes.

GEOG 3333: Urban Geography

The historical development of the urban environment on a global basis. Special attention focuses on the internal spatial structure of cities, their functions and problems.

GEOG 4330: Geography of Natural Resources

A spatial analysis of the earth’s natural resources, including mineral and energy resources as well as forests, fisheries and agricultural lands. Special attention focuses on political, economic and environmental aspects of the exploitation and use of resources.

INST 1351: Introduction to International Studies

A survey of factors affecting interaction within the international community. The focus is on the meaning, purposes and methodologies of international studies as a framework for better understanding historical, social, cultural, economic and political issues and trends within the human family.

INST 2352: Research Methods in Int' Stud

An overview of research and writing techniques used in the field of international studies to develop evidence-based solutions to global issues. This course introduces data collection and analysis techniques that lead to understanding and addressing issues of global concern. Additional emphasis is placed on standard academic writing in the field of international studies. Pre-requisite: INST 1351

INST 3343: Latin America Since Independence

A topical examination of the history of one or more Latin American nations since independence, with a concentration on the persons, events and institutions that help to explain current developments in Latin America.

INST 3351: Comparative Political Systems

An overview of the world’s political cultures, systems, behavior, and institutions. The objective is to develop a background with which to assess and explain differences in political culture, governmental structures and political behavior, and to appreciate the effects these factors have on international relations. Prerequisite: INST 1351 or permission of faculty member.

INST 3352: International Politics

Theories of international politics and the decision–making process that generates foreign policy. An examination of the role of power in the modern world, the utility of force in conflict resolution versus the multilateral, collaborative approach. An introduction to the way current international politics is increasingly related to the world economic situation with special attention to the role of multinational corporations, international trade and finance. Prerequisites: INST 1351 or permission of faculty member. (POSC 3352)

INST 3354: International Political Economy

This course examines the interrelationship between political and economic factors in international relations. Theoretical perspectives on the relationship between international economics and politics, trade policies, trends in integration of political and economic systems, the role of multinational corporations and economic organizations in the modern world. Prerequisites: INST 3352 or permission of faculty member.

INST 3355: Intercultural Issues

A survey of world cultures, the factors distinguishing them from one another and the impact that cultural differences have on international relations. Special emphasis is placed on current cultural issues of major concern to the international community. Prerequisite: INST 1351 or permission of faculty member.

INST 3357: Regional Study of Europe

An interdisciplinary survey of Europe, focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today. Prerequisite: INST 1351 or permission faculty member.

INST 3359: Regional Study of Latin America

An interdisciplinary survey of Latin America, focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today. Prerequisite: INST 1351 or permission of faculty member.

INST 3360: Regional Study of East Asia

An interdisciplinary survey of East Asia focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today. Prerequisite: INST 1351 or permission of faculty member.

INST 3370: Politics Economics and Society

This course provides students with the skills on how to use basic economic principles to understand some of the most pressing issues facing our societies, such as unequal distribution of wealth and resources, future of work, impact of climate change, wealth creation, and innovation, among others. Students will gain hands-on training in understanding and using data to measure economic and policy effectiveness.

INST 4099: Senior Thesis (Continuation)

This course is the second semester continuation of a two-semester long (3 credit) capstone course in which majors develop, elaborate, and research a topic of their own choosing, in consultation with their thesis director. The result of this intensive research and writing exercise will be a thesis fit for presentation at a professional conference and UST Research Day. Prerequisite: INST 4399

INST 4191: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only.

INST 4291: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only

INST 4351: Latin American Economic Development

This course provides students with the skills on how to use basic economic principles to understand some of the most pressing issues facing our societies, such as unequal distribution of wealth and resources, future of work, impact of climate change, wealth creation, and innovation, among others. Students will gain hands-on training in understanding and using data to measure economic and policy effectiveness.

INST 4358: Contemporary Mexico

This course is an introduction to the political and economic trends underway in Mexico. The political sphere includes features of the current political system, electoral processes, the evolution of nongovernmental organizations and the relation of the Mexican government with civil society, business and labor sectors. The economic sphere focuses on Mexico’s role in NAFTA and regional integration, and the bilateral relationship of Mexico with the United States.Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4359: Latin America Cultures: Diversity, Paradoxes and Transformation

This course examines how the interplay of cultures affects our daily lives and how values and beliefs can shape cultural regions. While the course will cover broad theory, particular focus will be on Latin America. The key question is: who is the Latin American? This course will review and deconstruct the paradigm of Latin American character and how it impacts and is impacted by the church, work relations, family, race and gender. The influences of particular historical, geographic and socio–economic forces in Latin American build an image of a coherent cultural region. This is an image, however, full of intra–regional diversity. To what extent then does the cultural ideal type accommodate this diversity? Mexico, Brazil and Argentina will be examined for answers to these questions. Prerequisite: 60+credit hours

INST 4360: Perspectives on Modern China

This course presents the history of modern China from 1860s to today. The course begins with China’s forced opening to the West after the Opium Wars and concludes with China’s transition at the start of the 21st Century. While emphasizing the chronological record of China’s development, discussion also focuses on the changing images of China at home in the West over one and a half centuries. Reliance upon text material is accented by frequent use of film to bring these images and events to life. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4361: Global Energy

This course explores the political, social and economic issues surrounding the global exploration, supply, and consumption of energy. The politics of energy examines the national, multinational, and transnational actors that compete for energy resources. The relationship between energy and security is investigated with special attention to the Middle East, China , India , and the United States . The social consequences of the search for and use of fossil fuels is examined, as well as the economics of fossil fuels, biomass, and renewal energy resources. Considerable attention will be granted to studies forecasting future supply and demand, as well as the cost benefit analysis of alternative energy sources. Prerequisite: 60+credit hours

INST 4362: Globalization and Gender Issues

This course examines the relationship between the globalization phenomena and issues related to gender treatment and equity. Primary emphasis will be granted to the effect of globalization on female labor. This topic will be explored in the context of socioeconomic development within and across developed and developing societies. .Major conceptual approaches to understand development will be addressed and assessed through quantitative and qualitative analyses. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4364: International Law

Beginning with the customs and sources of international jurisprudence, this course introduces essential legal terminology and distinctions focusing on the lawful exercise of power of nations. Relevant topics include international organizations and methods of dispute resolution, especially armed conflict, human rights, global environmental law, and law of the sea, air, and space. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4365: Development and Democracy

This course provides an extensive examination of the conceptualization and measurement of “development” and “democracy.” The course begins with discussion and analysis of the extant model of development as it developed in Western Europe and North America. This model is then applied and tested in regions of the world outside of the core–industrialized states to ascertain its applicability historically and empirically. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4366: International Security

This course exposes students to a focused look at security studies of peace and war, with application to understanding the source and nature of conflicts over time. State and systemic security is approached from a perspective broader than traditional conventional security by examining economic, health, and environmental challenges to states. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4367: U. S. Security Policy and Strategy

This seminar examines the challenges that the United States confronts in international affairs in the first decades of the twenty–first century; will analyze the foreign and national security policies the country pursues to meet these challenges; and will evaluate the strategies it deploys to implement those policies. The course will place these themes in their historical context. Among the subjects explored are nature of power and the uses of diplomacy in the contemporary world; United States’ diplomatic, foreign policy, and national security traditions; the National Security Strategy of the United States; the utility of the concepts of sovereignty, hegemony, and the balance of power; the impact of globalization and anti–Americanism on U.S. policy and strategy; and the U.S. approach to failed states, transnational threats, democracy promotion, and conflict termination. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4368: International Projects: Structuring and Development

This course exposes students to the basic analytical skills and practical experiences needed to generally understand the rationale for and execution of international projects from identification to start of operations. It covers the general theories and practices used by multilateral and governmental organizations as well as large corporations to identify, justify, structure, negotiate and fund international projects. The course is designed to provide practical analytical skills to students who would like to develop careers in the international arena. Among the subjects this course will explore are project development; project finance; risk identification and mitigation; international legal structuring and negotiations; and project viability analysis. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4369: Seminar in International Development Studies

This course sees individuals as active agents of change in any given society. Through an integrated analysis of economic, social and political activities involving a variety of institutions and many interactive agencies it seeks to understand and analyze the roles and interconnections between certain crucial instrumental freedoms and their prospects for development. In part, these include economic opportunities, political rights, social facilities, transparency guarantees, and protective security. Course format will present opportunities for exploring development, including a formal debate on the role of societal arrangements. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4370: Global Health

The study of global health requires the examination of predominant health issues and current health policy from the local to international perspectives and analysis. The increasingly open flow of resources, including human capital, and the potential of the catastrophic impact of epidemics and pandemics has transformed health from a domestic to a multi–national concern and challenge. Emphasis will be on the international health regime characterized by the institutional rules, norms, and organizations that address global health. Specifically, this course examines and discusses topics in health– and organization–related issues, including a current survey of global health problems, surveillance of diseases and injuries, basic methods for outbreak investigation, international health policies and treaties, and introduction to organizational theories relevant to global health. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4371: International Human Rights

This course introduces the theoretical, legal and policy issues of importance in human rights discourse. Students will be provided a solid grounding in the key texts, documents and literature on the subject and will be equipped with a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental legal, political and nongovernmental organizations which underpin human rights practice. Emphasis will be international in nature and will focus on the international rules and institutions that address human rights. No prior knowledge of the law or any particular legal system is required. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4374: Seminar in Middle East Studies

This course complements INST 3363 (Regional Study: North Africa and the Middle East) by examining the dynamics, debates, and crises that mark the modern Middle East. Topically it includes women and gender in the Middle East; the economics of oil; water as a scarce and contentious resource; Muslim fundamentalism; the Arab–Israeli conflict; the politics of armament. Topics rotate from semester to semester. It will strengthen methods and analytical capabilities for understanding the complexities of current affairs in this strategic world region. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4375: Contemporary Brazil

This course deals with key factors in the historical formation of Brazil; key factors which have shaped major contemporary issues. Among them, the course will highlight the formation of the territory and Brazilian identity, miscegenation and racial identity, land and income distribution, urbanization and urban violence. Students will learn to discuss contemporary attempts of development in the country, their failures and successes, and the involvement of the different social classes and major religious groups in these attempts. Furthermore, the discussion will place the Brazilian experience within the context of Latin America and the International community. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4376: Contemporary Taiwan

This course is a survey of the contemporary history, politics, economics, and external relations of the Republic of China on Taiwan, known to most of the world as simply Taiwan. While founded on mainland China in 1912, the Republic of China we know today has been shaped largely by events after 1949. On the verge of total defeat near the end of China's civil war, the Nationalist government reestablished itself on the island of Taiwan. Since 1949, Taiwan has transitioned from abject poverty to one of the wealthiest societies in the world; from fascism to liberal democracy; and from near universal diplomatic recognition to nearly complete diplomatic isolation. This course will explore the immense challenges faced by Taiwan's people and government and investigate the manner in which such an imperiled island managed such a fascinating process of change. Highlighted as well is the prominent role played by the United States in guaranteeing the regional security necessary for Taiwan's ascendance. Prerequisite: 60+ credit hours

INST 4377: Government-Business Relations in the Developing World

This course explores the country risks businesses and non-profits face in the developing world, including government instability, the lack of government capacity, insecurity, dysfunctional legal systems, corruption, human rights violations, poverty, poor infrastructure, and a low level of social services, including poor education and health care. We will look at how entities evaluate these risks before entering a country and how they manage these risks once on the ground. We will also discuss the ethical issues encountered in doing business in developing countries. The course will provide a foundation for anyone interested in doing business or otherwise working in developing countries. While the course is organized around specific risks, it will also review the broader issues common to developing countries. Prerequisites: INST 1351 and INST 1352

INST 4378: Seminar in Social Entrepreneurship

This course examines the potential of the private sector to foster human development on local and global scales. We examine what different corporations and small entrepreneurs are doing to make a profit and better our planet. The course also offers perspectives about what enterprises could or should be doing to promote sustainability, and it explores how corporate social responsibility can be a useful tool for business men and women around the world navigate across cultures and classes; make a living' and promote sustainable economic development. The course is also an informal invitation to become social entrepreneurs with real social values at the course of our goals and objectives. The course will foster our own social entrepreneurship principles, based on the idea that the market can be a tool for delivering profit while also generating many other values with real and substantial marginal social benefits.

INST 4379: Cyber Warfare

This course overviews the growth and scope of cyber warfare and its impacts on national power in the domains of government, diplomacy, international law, international commerce/economic power, social media/privacy, science/technology, and civil society. It traces the evolution of conflict from traditional information gathering to the development of cyber weaponry with destructive capabilities and the use of those capabilities to advance national foreign policy interests. Through the use of case studies and selective readings from a variety of sources (government policy directives, cyber security industry studies, and defense related academic papers), the course guides students through the emergent quality of the broadening scope of cyber conflict and the multifaceted response to the challenge. Ultimately, students are confronted with the impact of the ongoing threat as they interface with cyberspace in their day-to-day interactions. The goal is for a deeper understanding of the scope and complexity of the cyber domain and the global conflict that is raging out of view.

INST 4380: Global Conflict Resolution

This course begins with the premise that conflict is a part of everyday life that spans across every inch of the globe and is found in all careers and relationships, so it is designed to be a practical course that provides a comprehensive overview of conflict resolution from a micro (person-to-person) to a global perspective. This course reviews the theoretical components while exploring conflict within different contexts, including intergroup, interpersonal, cross-cultural, legal, and international, by analyzing select global conflicts and learning to identify its primary and secondary participants. This course introduces positive conflict management skills, including active listening, communication skills, principled negotiation, facilitation, and peacekeeping skills. This skill-based course will explore how these variables and behavioral attributes have, and can, influence global conflicts through escalation and de-escalation. Upon completion of this course and attendance in class for at least 40 hours, as designated by Texas State Statute, graduate and undergraduate students will be able to mediate globally with their basic mediation certificate.

INST 4381: International Security in East Asia

This course will provide a broader understanding of security and geopolitics in East Asia. With the rise of China and the nuclear threat from North Korea, the security dynamics within and beyond East Asian states is of critical importance to both the United States and the world. To better comprehend such complex security dynamics in East Asia, this course will review the historical progress of diplomatic and security related interactions between East Asian countries, and their relations with the United States as well. After a profound understanding of the history is acquired, this course will guide students to analyze the current events and potential changes in this region and derive policy implications and strategic proposals for the East Asian countries and the United States.

INST 4391: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only

INST 4398: Senior Thesis in International Studies

Capstone course in which students develop, elaborate, and research a topic of historical and/or contemporary relevance. The result of this intensive research and writing exercise will be a thesis fit for presentation at a professional conference and UST Research Symposium. Prerequisite: Senior standing, INST 2352

INST 4399: Senior Thesis in International Studies II

This course is the second semester continuation of a two–semester long capstone degree requirement in which majors develop, elaborate, and research a topic of their own choosing, in consultation with their thesis director. It is expected that the result of this intensive research and writing exercise will be a thesis fit for presentation at a professional conference and UST Research Symposium. Prerequisite: INST 4398

INST 4491: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only

INST 4591: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only

INST 4691: Internship in International Studies

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the international field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only

LALS 4399: Senior Research in Latin American and Latino Studies

Research-based project open to Latin American and Latino Studies minors in their senior year. Project topic to be approved and supervised by a Latin American and Latino Studies faculty member according to standards and guidelines available from the program director.

MDSA 4370: Global Health

The study of global health requires the examination of predominant health issues and current health policy from the local to international perspectives and analysis. The increasingly open flow of resources, including human capital, and the potential of the catastrophic impact of epidemics and pandemics has transformed health from a domestic to a multi–national concern and challenge. Emphasis will be on the international health regime characterized by the institutional rules, norms, and organizations that address global health. Specifically, this course examines and discusses topics in health– and organization–related issues, including a current survey of global health problems, surveillance of diseases and injuries, basic methods for outbreak investigation, international health policies and treaties, and introduction to organizational theories relevant to global health.

MDSA 5301: Introduction to Diplomacy and Strategic Policy

This seminar is intended to provide a deeper, graduate-level analysis of the art and practice of diplomacy, and the statecraft fundamental to the formulation and successful pursuit of persuasive strategic policy. The nature of leaders and their leadership, the psychology which underpins the proclivities of individual leaders, and their ability to communicate persuasively to both domestic and international influencers will be a course focus. We will examine the practical dimensions of diplomacy as practiced in the 21st century: the “special” role of the US; changing diplomatic practices; the growing need to manage public, social media; the increasingly powerful influence of non-state actors; the impact of revolutionary and post-colonial states; the need for moral leadership and innovative concepts such as the “responsibility to protect”; and, finally, alternatives to diplomacy as appropriate means for mediating relations between an ever-growing number of groups and states in a more complex world. The course will utilize a largely case study method, taking a deep dive into 4-6 major issues. One to two will be watershed historical events, to examine how diplomatic tools were used in support of an overall strategic policy. How was strategic policy developed, how was diplomacy used to advance that chosen strategic policy, and what blowback was experienced? Another 3-4 case studies will analyze seminal, central current issues; students will prepare both a strategic policy and negotiations talking points, among other activities. How could or can the strategic policy and diplomacy be deployed for a better result?

MDSA 5302: Analytics in Strategic Affairs

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic quantitative methodology in the social sciences and to teach them research design from the conception of an idea to the analysis and interpretation of data.

MDSA 5303: Advanced Seminar in Diplomacy and Strategic Studies

This course provides an in-depth investigation into one of the essential topics in Diplomacy and Strategic Studies. The potential topics are theories of politics, economics, diplomacy, and/or strategic studies in the decision-making process that generates foreign policy. In addition, students will be exposed to a broad range of contemporary diplomatic events and puzzles in which the United States and other nations have encountered in the past, is facing currently, and will envision in the near future. The key essence of this course is to facilitate a strong understanding of these issues and develop a number of strategic approaches to manage or even resolve them through theoretical and practical perspectives provided in this course. Students are expected to acquire substantial knowledge of a specific topic in Diplomacy and Strategic Studies after finishing this course.

MDSA 5351: Comparative Political Systems

An overview of the worlds political cultures, systems, behavior, and institutions. The objective is to develop a background with which to assess and explain differences in political culture, governmental structures and political behavior, and to appreciate the effects these factors have on international relations.

MDSA 5352: International Politics

Theories of international politics and the decision–making process that generates foreign policy. An examination of the role of power in the modern world and the utility of force in conflict resolution versus the multilateral, collaborative approach. An introduction to the way current international politics is increasingly related to the world economic situation with special attention to the role of multinational corporations, international trade and finance.

MDSA 5354: International Political Economy

This course examines the interrelationship between political and economic factors in international relations. Theoretical perspectives on the relationship between international economics and politics, trade policies, trends in integration of political and economic systems, the role of multinational corporations and economic organizations in the modern world.

MDSA 5355: Intercultural Issues

A survey of world cultures, the factors distinguishing them from one another and the impact that cultural differences have on international relations. Special emphasis is placed on current cultural issues of major concern to the international community.

MDSA 5357: Regional Study of Europe

An interdisciplinary survey of Europe, focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today.

MDSA 5359: Regional Study of Latin America

An interdisciplinary survey of Latin America, focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today.

MDSA 5360: Regional Study of East Asia

An interdisciplinary survey of East Asia focusing on the geographic, historical, cultural, economic and political factors most affecting the role of this region in the international community today.

MDSA 5366: The American Foreign Policy Process

The foreign–policy–making process and factors influencing U.S. international behavior since 1945. Special emphasis on foreign policy issues affecting United States’ interests in the coming decade.

MDSA 6351: Latin American Economic Development

This course provides students with the skills on how to use basic economic principles to understand some of the most pressing issues facing our societies, such as unequal distribution of wealth and resources, future of work, impact of climate change, wealth creation, and innovation, among others. Students will gain hands-on training in understanding and using data to measure economic and policy effectiveness.

MDSA 6358: Contemporary Mexico

This course is an introduction to the political and economic trends underway in Mexico. The political sphere includes features of the current political system, electoral processes, the evolution of nongovernmental organizations and the relation of the Mexican government with civil society, business and labor sectors. The economic sphere focuses on Mexico’s role in NAFTA and regional integration, and the bilateral relationship of Mexico with the United States.

MDSA 6359: Latin America Cultures: Diversity, Paradoxes and Transformation

This course examines how the interplay of cultures affects our daily lives and how values and beliefs can shape cultural regions. While the course will cover broad theory, particular focus will be on Latin America. The key question is: who is the Latin American? This course will review and deconstruct the paradigm of Latin American character and how it impacts and is impacted by the church, work relations, family, race and gender. The influences of particular historical, geographic and socio–economic forces in Latin American build an image of a coherent cultural region. This is an image, however, full of intra–regional diversity. To what extent then does the cultural ideal type accommodate this diversity? Mexico, Brazil and Argentina will be examined for answers to these questions.

MDSA 6360: Perspectives on Modern China

This course presents the history of modern China from 1860s to today. The course begins with China's forced opening to the West after the Opium Wars and concludes with China's transition at the start of the 21st Century. While emphasizing the chronological record of China's development, discussion also focuses on the changing images of China at home in the West over one and a half centuries. Reliance upon text material is accented by frequent use of film to bring these images and events to life.

MDSA 6361: Global Energy

This course explores the political, social and economic issues surrounding the global exploration, supply, and consumption of energy. The politics of energy examines the national, multinational, and transnational actors that compete for energy resources. The relationship between energy and security is investigated with special attention to the Middle East, China, India, and the United States. The social consequences of the search for and use of fossil fuels is examined, as well as the economics of fossil fuels, biomass, and renewal energy resources. Considerable attention will be granted to studies forecasting future supply and demand, as well as the cost benefit analysis of alternative energy sources.

MDSA 6364: International Law

Beginning with the customs and sources of international jurisprudence, this course introduces essential legal terminology and distinctions focusing on the lawful exercise of power of nations. Relevant topics include international organizations and methods of dispute resolution, especially armed conflict, human rights, global environmental law, and law of the sea, air, and space.

MDSA 6366: International Security

This course exposes students to a focused look at security studies of peace and war, with application to understanding the source and nature of conflicts over time. State and systemic security is approached from a perspective broader than traditional conventional security by examining economic, health, and environmental challenges to states.

MDSA 6369: Seminar in International Development Studies

This course sees individuals as active agents of change in any given society. Through an integrated analysis of economic, social and political activities involving a variety of institutions and many interactive agencies it seeks to understand and analyze the roles and interconnections between certain crucial instrumental freedoms and their prospects for development. In part, these include economic opportunities, political rights, social facilities, transparency guarantees, and protective security. Course format will present opportunities for exploring development, including a formal debate on the role of societal arrangements.

MDSA 6371: International Human Rights

This course introduces the theoretical, legal and policy issues of importance in human rights discourse. Students will be provided a solid grounding in the key texts, documents and literature on the subject and will be equipped with a knowledge and understanding of the fundamental legal, political and nongovernmental organizations which underpin human rights practice. Emphasis will be international in nature and will focus on the international rules and institutions that address human rights. No prior knowledge of the law or any particular legal system is required.

MDSA 6374: Seminar in Middle East Studies

This course complements INST 3363 (Regional Study: North Africa and the Middle East) by examining the dynamics, debates, and crises that mark the modern Middle East. Topically it includes women and gender in the Middle East; the economics of oil; water as a scarce and contentious resource; Muslim fundamentalism; the Arab–Israeli conflict; the politics of armament. Topics rotate from semester to semester. It will strengthen methods and analytical capabilities for understanding the complexities of current affairs in this strategic world region.

MDSA 6376: Contemporary Taiwan

This course is a survey of the contemporary history, politics, economics, and external relations of the Republic of China on Taiwan, known to most of the world as simply Taiwan. While founded on mainland China in 1912, the Republic of China we know today has been shaped largely by events after 1949. On the verge of total defeat near the end of China’s civil war, the Nationalist government reestablished itself on the island of Taiwan. Since 1949, Taiwan has transitioned from abject poverty to one of the wealthiest societies in the world; from fascism to liberal democracy; and from near universal diplomatic recognition to nearly complete diplomatic isolation. This course will explore the immense challenges faced by Taiwan’s people and government and investigate the manner in which such an imperiled island managed such a fascinating process of change. Highlighted as well is the prominent role played by the United States in guaranteeing the regional security necessary for Taiwan’s ascendance.

MDSA 6377: Government-Business Relations in the Developing World

This course explores the country risks businesses and non–profit organizations face in the developing world, including government instability, the lack of government capacity, insecurity, dysfunctional legal systems, corruption, human rights violations, poverty, poor infrastructure, and a low level of social services, including poor education and health care. Examined will be how such entities evaluate these risks before entering a country and how they manage these risks once on the ground. The course also analyzes the ethical issues encountered in doing business in developing countries.

MDSA 6379: Cyber Warfare

This course overviews the growth and scope of cyber warfare and its impacts on national power in the domains of government, diplomacy, international law, international commerce/economic power, social media/privacy, science/technology, and civil society. It traces the evolution of conflict from traditional information gathering to the development of cyber weaponry with destructive capabilities and the use of those capabilities to advance national foreign policy interests. Through the use of case studies and selective readings from a variety of sources (government policy directives, cyber security industry studies, and defense related academic papers), the course guides students through the emergent quality of the broadening scope of cyber conflict and the multifaceted response to the challenge. Ultimately, students are confronted with the impact of the ongoing threat as they interface with cyberspace in their day-to-day interactions. The goal is for a deeper understanding of the scope and complexity of the cyber domain and the global conflict that is raging out of view.

MDSA 6381: International Security in East Asia

This course will provide a broader understanding of security and geopolitics in East Asia. With the rise of China and the nuclear threat from North Korea, the security dynamics within and beyond East Asian states is of critical importance to both the United States and the world. To better comprehend such complex security dynamics in East Asia, this course will review the historical progress of diplomatic and security related interactions between East Asian countries, and their relations with the United States as well. After a profound understanding of the history is acquired, this course will guide students to analyze the current events and potential changes in this region and derive policy implications and strategic proposals for the East Asian countries and the United States.

MDSA 6391: Internship in MDSA

Work experience in business, government, media or private, not–for–profit agencies in the MDSA field. To be arranged with the director. Consent required: Department. Course offered Pass/Fail basis only.

MDSA 6393: Special Topics in Diplomacy and Strategic Studies

Special Topics courses cover varying topics relevant to diplomacy and strategic affairs and are designed to be taught by past or current practitioners or content specialists. Such courses will provide theoretical and technical coverage of regional, country, and/or topic-based content from semester to semester. Special Topics courses allow students to pursue deeper examination of particular issues and areas of their interest. The key essence of these courses is to complement the student’s contextual understanding of the prescribed curriculum of the MDSA Program.

MDSA 6399: Capstone Project

This course is project-based course and the capstone experience for the MA Diplomacy and Strategic Affairs Program. Through hybrid instruction, the course combines synchronous seminar and asynchronous directed research in small teams. Drawing from, and applying, prior course work, students will develop, research, and present on a topic of relevance to the resolution of a key issue/problem in diplomacy and strategic affairs. The capstone will produce a white paper and presentation suitable for presentation to practitioners and/or scholars in the field.

MPPA 5301: Economic Analysis for Public Policy

Economic analysis is widely used in various public policy fields such as environmental policy, social welfare, and labor market analysis. Economic principles of consumer and producer theory, social welfare economics, public goods and externalities, market failure, market structure, production theory, and fiscal policy offer many insights into use of economics to derive solutions for public policy problems. This course will provide students with an understanding of how economic theory can be used to assess the desirability of government interventions, their justification, and implications for efficiency and fairness, using specific policy areas as examples.

MPPA 5302: Decision Making for Public Policy

The objective of this course is to make the student a better producer, consumer, and evaluator of public policy analyses. It will strengthen decision making ability and skills regarding public policy issues. The course does not focus on methodology per se, but rather looks at the results of methodology as they frame and shape public policy issues. Thus the focus of the course is on the role of managers and executives in systematically seeking, organizing and analyzing information to address policy problems.

MPPA 5303: Public Leadership: Principles, Practices, and Realities

This course is designed for students seeking to become effective public leaders--as government officials and staff, issue advocates, or social entrepreneurs. Students will be challenged to think critically about the moral responsibilities and ethical dilemmas of public leadership; to understand the competing demands on leaders trying to accommodate politics, institutional constraints, and the multiple agendas of interested parties; to examine your own capacity for leadership; and to discover new ways to think about and exercise leadership for the public good.

MPPA 5304: Comparative Public Policy and Administration

The course examines public policy and administration across national contexts. With a focus on comparing public policy and administration in federal and unitary governments, the U.S., European, Asian, and developing countries are analyzed for the scope of their public policy and administration on select issues. The course centers on budgetary policies and discretionary spending for social policies including education and healthcare. As a final project, students chose a policy issue of interest to compare administration between countries.

MPPA 5305: U.S. Energy Policy

a) This course will address U.S. energy policy with respect to how the U.S. governs the production and use of different energy sources, along with the management of its energy infrastructure. The goal of the course is to gain an understanding of policies currently in place, as well as proposals for alternatives, while examining the economic, environmental, national security and energy security implications of different policy approaches.

MPPA 5306: U.S. Health Policy

This course analyzes key contemporary issues in healthcare policy. This course includes design and structure of the U.S. healthcare system, policy initiatives and the roles of government, the private sector, consumers, and advocacy groups in setting policy agenda, historical, socioeconomic, political, environmental forces that influence the U.S. healthcare system, financing, and delivery of personal and public health services; health services, policy concepts, and terminology, including health determinants, access to care, system integration, policy development, federalism.

MPPA 5307: U.S. Environmental Policy

This course will address current issues in environmental policy: biodiversity, land use including wilderness protection, climate change, environmental justice, economic growth, and ecological sustainability.

MPPA 5308: Government Regulation

This course will offer an analysis of the federal, state, and local regulatory process as it affects the public and private sectors. It will address the regulatory process from legal, economic, administrative, and political perspectives.

MPPA 5309: U.S. Science and Technology Policy

Prior to WW II, the American government played a relatively small role in the support of science, especially outside of its own institutions. That situation changed dramatically with the war and the Cold War that followed. We explore how these events transformed the role of science in American life, vastly enhancing the prestige of scientists, and shaping the extent and the nature of federal involvement in science. These and later developments, including the commercialization of academic research, raise important questions about the appropriate role of science and scientists in a democracy. In particular: How can we reconcile the need for scientific and technological expertise on the one hand, and for the democratic control of science on the other? We consider different theoretical approaches to this issue, and illustrate the dilemmas it poses with a number of empirical examples.

MPPA 5310: Policy Development and Implementation

This course emphasizes the importance of a working knowledge of public-sector policymaking and the analysis of public policy problems in order to understand how public policy is formulated, decided upon, and implemented, and the impact that the political, economic, cultural and bureaucratic context has on the policymaking process and outcomes. Emphasis is on agenda setting, program design, and implementation.

MPPA 5311: Program Evaluation in Public Management

a) This course addresses public sector policy and program evaluation through examination of methodological considerations for design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination. The course emphasizes the history of evaluation, the social indicators movement, the politics of program evaluation, goal identification, performance measurement, methods of analysis, participants in the evaluation process, and the problems with partisanship.

MPPA 5312: Strategic Planning

This course develops a working knowledge of planning in the public sector through five types of planning modules: basic strategic planning; issue-based or goal-based strategic planning; the alignment model; scenario planning; and organic or self-organizing planning.

MPPA 5313: Urban and Regional Planning

This course examines the principles of urban and regional planning practices. Emphasis is placed on social, economic and housing planning and the relationship between conceptual frameworks, research perspectives, practical and political considerations, and public policy.

MPPA 5314: State and Local Government Administration

This course studies the structures, functions, policy processes, funding sources and administrative practices of state and local governments. It compares and contrasts the distinctions and analyzes their strengths and weaknesses.

MPPA 5316: Federalism and Public Policy

This course discusses how federalism and intergovernmental relations affect public finance, policy, and administration. Salient issues of intergovernmental relations in the areas of environmental protection, welfare distribution, education, homeland security, immigration, and health care.

MPPA 5317: Social Justice and Public Policy

This course examines the values of social justice that motivate action in the public arena; thinks about how those values create concerns and solutions; and explores issues of equity and liberty, of balancing the rights of the individual, the common good, and redistribution.

MPPA 5354: Emergency Management

This course focuses on the evolution of U.S. disaster policy and the practice of emergency management, with particular attention to the roles of local governments and nonprofit agencies in disaster management. The course examines the major policy issues, including the utility of the "all-hazard" or comprehensive model of emergency management, the role of the military in disaster operations, state and local capacity building, and the design and implementation of hazard mitigation policies and programs.

MPPA 5372: Public Personnel Administration

An introduction to civil service systems in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following topics: the history of the U.S. Civil Service, position classification systems, equal employment opportunity, employee recruitment, in-service training, performance appraisals, employee motivation and collective bargaining.

MPPA 5374: Public Organizations: Theory and Behavior

An examination of how bureaucracy has become the central form of organization in terms of how governments administer public policy in a mass society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the degree to which society has become bureaucratized and on what democratic alternatives are available to temper the excesses of bureaucracy.

MPPA 5376: Public Budgeting & Finance

This course examines the techniques and politics of raising and spending public funds. It discusses topics such as deficits politics, legislative and executive powers and the budgetary role of the courts. It assesses the impacts of taxing and spending policies and explores issues relevant to national, state, and local governments.

MPPA 5391: Internship in Public Policy and Administration

The course is an opportunity for students to gain public service organization experience. It provides the student an opportunity for experience in the political arena. This internship may be at the local, state or national level, serving as an intern in city government, state government offices in Houston, Texas or the Houston office of a Texas state legislator, U.S. House, or U.S. Senate member, or NGO under a government contract.

MPPA 5392: Directed Readings: Professional Paper

This course satisfies the non-thesis option for the Master of Public Policy and Administration degree. A problem or topic in either public policy or public administration will be selected. The student will write a substantial paper, one of professional quality, for submission to the student’s supervising faculty advisor.

MPPA 5398: Master Thesis I

The purpose of the MPPA thesis is to give students experience conducting the kind of inquiry that will be useful in their professional career. Under the supervision of a thesis chair, students will select a public administration or public policy problem, prepare a proposal detailing the research question, complete the research, write their thesis with full documentation and defend their work before the Chair and second reader.

MPPA 5399: Master Thesis II

The purpose of the MPPA thesis continuation is to assist the student in the completion of the thesis begun under MPPA 5398. It is expected that if a continuation is used by the student that there is extensive research that requires extended time for thesis completion. The course can only be used to fulfill the MPPA degree capstone requirements.

POSC 2331: American Federal Government

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

POSC 2332: Texas State and Local Government

This course will provide students with an introduction to Texas State government and politics within the context of other US states and the federal government. Students will learn general information about state governments in the public policy process, specifically Texas State government. Students will assess state political cultures, as well as federalism and state constitutions, with a specific emphasis on the Texas State Constitution.

POSC 3301: Statistics for the Social Sciences

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic quantitative methodology in the social sciences and to teach them research design from the conception of an idea to the analysis and interpretation of data. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3318: Administrative Law

A study of the implementation of statutes by the executive agencies of government, covering enforcement, economic and social regulation, taxation, education, distribution of welfare benefits, land management and many other activities of government.

POSC 3332: Urban Government & Politics

This course covers the context in which city governments operate the politics and policymaking process of urban places, and the service delivery issues confronting municipalities. The course is designed to assist the student in obtaining an in–depth understanding of the politics of local public problems. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3333: Law and Society

How the values and attitudes of society influence the content and enforcement of the law and how the law influences the mores and behavior of society. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3334: Campaigns and Elections

Students are offered the opportunity to actively participate in the campaigns of candidates. Academic research is combined with “on–the–job” training. Classroom analysis and critique of the individual campaigns round out the course. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3337: Politics and the Media

This course analyzes the impact of the media on the American political system. There is an examination of the evolution of the media from the earliest days of the republic to its place of central importance in elections and governing today. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3352: International Politics

(INST 3352) Theories of international politics and the decision–making process that generates foreign policy. An examination of the role of power in the modern world, the utility of force in conflict resolution versus the multilateral, collaborative approach. An introduction to the way current international politics is increasingly related to the world economic situation, with special attention to the role of multinational corporations, international trade and finance. Prerequisites: POSC 2331 and 2332, INST 1351 or permission of faculty member.

POSC 3353: The Presidency and the Executive Branch

This course focuses on the role of the presidency in the American political system. Emphasis will be on the office and powers of the President, the expansion of the constitutional presidency and the changing nature of presidential politics. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3354: Emergency Management

This course focuses on the evolution of U.S. disaster policy and the practice of emergency management, with particular attention top the roles of local governments and nonprofit agencies in disaster management. The course examines the major policy issues, including the utility of the “all–hazard” or comprehensive model of emergency management, the role of the military in disaster operations, state and local capacity building, and the design and implementation of hazard mitigation policies and programs. Prerequisites: POSC 2331 and 2332.

POSC 3355: American Constitutional Law

An analysis of the development and evolutionary interpretation of the United States Constitution through study of decisions by the United States Supreme Court from 1789 to the present. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3356: American Constitutional Law II

Examines the American constitutional law of criminal justice and criminal procedure as it relates to the administration of criminal substantive law, and the procedural law of arrest, stop and frisk, search, confessions, identification, preliminary hearings, bail, indictment, plea bargaining, venue, discovery, trial, sentencing, appeal, and habeas corpus. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3358: Public Opinion and Voting Behavior

The political behavior of the mass public in modern democratic systems, especially the United States. Major areas of emphasis will include: political socialization and learning, public opinion and attitude formation, participation and voting behavior. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332

POSC 3360: Introduction to Justice & Peace Studies

A basic overview of justice and peace studies, based on the seven main principles of Catholic Social Teaching. Among the topics that will be reviewed in conjunction with these principles are the dignity of the human person, community–building, human rights, economic development, culture, class, and gender concerns, conflict resolution and care for the environment. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3362: Minority Politics

An examination of political participation by minorities (African–American, Asian–American, Latin–American, Native American, women, and other minorities) in American politics, and of the impact of public policies on minority groups. Particular reference will be made to Texas and U.S. Southwest politics. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3363: Latino Politics

A survey of the forms of political participation and types of public policies that affect Latinos in the United States. Particular reference will be made to Texas and U.S. Southwest politics. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332

POSC 3371: Introduction to Public Administration

An overview of the basic components of administration in government and nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include executive branch structures, federalism, budgeting, policymaking, personnel administration and ethics. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3372: Public Personnel Administration

An introduction to civil service systems in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following topics: the history of the U.S. Civil Service, position classification systems, equal employment opportunity, employee recruitment, in–service training, performance appraisals, employee motivation and collective bargaining. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3375: Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations

This course examines the origins, foundations and 200–year history of the American system of national, state and local governance. The course will especially focus on how national, state and local governments interact through the intergovernmental process. Specific topics the course will cover include court cases on federalism, fiscal aspects of federalism, models of federalism, comparative federalism and the future of federalism. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 3376: Public Budgeting and Finance

Examines the techniques and politics of raising and spending public funds. Discusses topics such as deficits politics, legislative and executive powers, and the budgetary role of the courts. Assesses the impacts of taxing and spending policies. Explores issues relevant to national, state, and local governments. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4099: Senior Thesis (cont)

This course is the second semester continuation of a two–semester long (3 credit) capstone course in which majors develop, elaborate, and research a topic of their own choosing, in consultation with their thesis director. The result of this intensive research and writing exercise will be a thesis fit for presentation at a professional conference and UST Research Day. Prerequisite: POSC 4399.

POSC 4191: Internship in Political Science

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4303: American Political Theory

An introduction to the development of American political ideas from the colonial period to the present. Gender and minority perspectives are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4304: Contemporary Political Theory

An introduction to the development of political ideas in the 20th and 21st century. A comparison between Western and non-Western political theory is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4305: Religion and Politics

A basic review of the history and/or fundamental issues entailed in the interrelationship of religion and politics. In particular, the course will focus on the impact religion has on political participation, political institutions and political culture. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4311: Mock Trial

This course is designed to teach the basics of trial procedure through the use of simulations and mock trials. Students will read texts and discuss trial procedure and selected readings on the structure and procedures of trial courts. The main goal of the course is to impart the fundamentals necessary for successful participation in intercollegiate mock trial competition and to lay the groundwork for more advanced study in law school. The majority of class time in the second half of the course will be spent in "hands on" practice of these techniques in mock trials.

POSC 4332: Senior Seminar

A capstone course for government and pre-law senior students that explores and summarizes selected areas of government, law and the public arena. This course may be team taught. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4336: Development of Mesoamerican and Ancestral Puebloan Government in Mexico

Political anthropology course focused on a fresh evaluation of archaeological data leading to contemporary political and governmental conclusions about the intersection of Chaco/Aztec N.M./Paquimé and Mesoamerican cultures. This course provides an insightful alternative to eastern and western European approaches to the development of government.

POSC 4354: American Foreign Policy Process

(INST 4354) The foreign policy–making process and factors influencing U.S. international behavior since 1945. Special emphasis on foreign policy issues affecting United States interests in the coming decade. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4379: Cyber Warfare

This course overviews the growth and scope of cyber warfare and its impacts on national power in the domains of government, diplomacy, international law, international commerce/economic power, social media/privacy, science/technology, and civil society. It traces the evolution of conflict from traditional information gathering to the development of cyber weaponry with destructive capabilities and the use of those capabilities to advance national foreign policy interests. Through the use of case studies and selective readings from a variety of sources (government policy directives, cyber security industry studies, and defense related academic papers), the course guides students through the emergent quality of the broadening scope of cyber conflict and the multifaceted response to the challenge. Ultimately, students are confronted with the impact of the ongoing threat as they interface with cyberspace in their day-to-day interactions. The goal is for a deeper understanding of the scope and complexity of the cyber domain and the global conflict that is raging out of view.

POSC 4380: Global Conflict Resolution

This course begins with the premise that conflict is a part of everyday life that spans across every inch of the globe and is found in all careers and relationships, so it is designed to be a practical course that provides a comprehensive overview of conflict resolution from a micro (person-to-person) to a global perspective. This course reviews the theoretical components while exploring conflict within different contexts, including intergroup, interpersonal, cross-cultural, legal, and international, by analyzing select global conflicts and learning to identify its primary and secondary participants. This course introduces positive conflict management skills, including active listening, communication skills, principled negotiation, facilitation, and peacekeeping skills. This skill-based course will explore how these variables and behavioral attributes have, and can, influence global conflicts through escalation and de-escalation. Upon completion of this course and attendance in class for at least 40 hours, as designated by Texas State Statute, graduate and undergraduate students will be able to mediate globally with their basic mediation certificate.

POSC 4381: International Security in East Asia

This course will provide a broader understanding of security and geopolitics in East Asia. With the rise of China and the nuclear threat from North Korea, the security dynamics within and beyond East Asian states is of critical importance to both the United States and the world. To better comprehend such complex security dynamics in East Asia, this course will review the historical progress of diplomatic and security related interactions between East Asian countries, and their relations with the United States as well. After a profound understanding of the history is acquired, this course will guide students to analyze the current events and potential changes in this region and derive policy implications and strategic proposals for the East Asian countries and the United States.

POSC 4391: Internship in Political Science

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4399: Senior Thesis

Research–based project open to political science majors and others with the permission of the department. Project topic to be approved and supervised by the department according to the standards and guidelines available from the department chair. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4491: Internship in Political Science

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

POSC 4691: Internship in Political Science

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair. Prerequisites: POSC 2331, 2332.

SOCI 1301: Introductory Sociology

A scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology.

SOCI 1331: Principles of Sociology

The study of people in interdependence. Identification of social groups and observation of their structures, functions, interactions and coordination. Particular emphasis on the social processes and the development of group values and attitudes.

SOCI 3330: Transcultural Anthropology

A survey of anthropological approaches to both the recurrent patterns and wide variation of conduct in diverse cultures. Particular emphasis will be placed on Bronislaw Malinowski's functional approach and Clifford Geertz' interpretive approach to the study of cultures.

SOCI 4191: Internship in Sociology

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair.

SOCI 4291: Internship in Sociology

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair.

SOCI 4491: Internship in Sociology

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair.

SOCI 4591: Internship in Sociology

Practicum or on-the-job experience under the guidance of practicing specialists in the field. To be supervised individually by a department faculty member with the approval of the chair.