Engineering

Classes

ENGR 1100: Intro to Engineering Lab

This course, in combination with the Introduction to Engineering course ENGR 1300, is a first year course dedicated to the preparation of students for the future engineering curriculum. The lab component focuses on application of the mathematical principles via computer software (MATLAB and Excel).

ENGR 1102: Physics and Engineering Scholars Seminar

The Physics and Engineering Scholars seminar will enhance relevant concepts, techniques and problem-solving strategies needed in introductory Physics 1331 and Physics 2333 courses. The focus is on application of those concepts, techniques,and strategies to covered lecture topics in both Physics 1331 and 2333, such as motion in several dimensions, forces, energy, momentum, rotational motion, vibrations, and waves. This course is recommended for students who need to improve their quantitative reasoning and problem-solving skills to succeed in their introductory physics classes. Departmental Approval is needed to sign up for this course. This is a Pass/Fail course.

ENGR 1300: Introduction to Engineering

This introductory course will expose students to the field of engineering and the mathematics required for engineering courses. The focus will be on the application of mathematics to solving real-world engineering problems without heavy emphasis on the derivation. Topics covered will include solving engineering problems through applications of basic algebraic manipulations, trigonometry, vectors, sinusoids and harmonic signals, matrices and systems of equations, basics of differentiation, basics of integration, and differential equations.

ENGR 1314: Fundamentals of Computer-Aided Design

This course provides the fundamentals of engineering graphics. It is a prerequisite for any upper level engineering design classes. It introduces students to AutoCAD basics and will cover topics such as orthographic projections, pictorial drawings, dimensioning, sectioning, and tolerancing. An introduction to assembly drawings, threads and fasteners will also be part of this course.

ENGR 2100: Introduction to Engineering Design

An introduction to the engineering design process. Students complete a semester long design project from the problem recognition and definition stage through the implementation and testing phase. The project will require individual and group work, and is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of completing each step of the engineering design process.

ENGR 2105: Machining Technology

Introduction to common tools used in the machining and manufacturing of mechanical components. This course will focus on teaching the proper use, capabilities, and limitations of available tools and involve a hands-on project to create a machine component from raw materials.

ENGR 2302: Material and Energy Balances

This course covers the principles of mass and energy conservation and their application in process analysis and design. It includes topics such as stoichiometry, conservation of mass and energy, reaction stoichiometry, thermodynamic properties, and the use of process simulators to model and analyze chemical processes. Through problem-solving exercises, case studies, and design projects, students will learn how to apply their knowledge to analyze and design chemical processes in various industries.

ENGR 2410: Digital Design

Analysis and design of practical digital systems including combinational logic circuitry and finite state machine circuitry. Topics covered include logic gates, number systems, Boolean algebra, and synchronous sequential circuits, flip flops, memory devices and programmable logic.

ENGR 3131: Advanced Electronics Laboratory

Taken with the Corequisite (ENGR 3331) Electronics 2, this course uses simulations and experiments to examine the operation and applications of electronic solid-state devices including diodes, operational amplifiers (Op Amps), and transistors (MOSFETs and BJTs) used in electronic devices.

ENGR 3133: Electrical Circuits Lab

Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws, temperature sensors and Op Amps, strain gauges, passive and active filters, and programming PLCs. Application of computers and electric and electronic principles to mechanical systems.

ENGR 3138: Advanced Laboratory

Students study and perform a range of contemporary experiments using research equipment and techniques. Course covers a range of experimental methods including data collection, computational analysis, and presentation and communication of results.

ENGR 3139: Units Operations Laboratory I

Unit operations encompasses several hands-on laboratory experiments to support the concepts covered in chemical engineering. Included operations can be related to material covered in thermodynamics, fluids, transport processes, and process control. This course allows students to gain valuable knowledge using small scale versions of industrial operations equipment for various tasks such as separation, filtration, heat exchange, distillation, and absorption among others. The course emphasizes how the equipment and techniques could then be scaled from a laboratory setting to true industrial applications.

ENGR 3140: Unit Operations Laboratory 2

Students will learn advanced techniques in experimental design, data analysis, and process optimization, as applied to various unit operations, such as distillation, absorption, extraction, and reactor design. Topics covered include process control, instrumentation, and safety considerations in the laboratory setting. The course aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design and execute experiments, analyze data, and optimize chemical processes in a laboratory setting.

ENGR 3145: Electrochemical Energy Systems Laboratory

This course, in combination with the Electrochemical Energy Systems lecture course covers the basic fundamentals of electrochemical devices and material. The lab components will include some experiments applying the principles covered in the lecture course like building a fuel cell, working with super-capacitors, and solar cells.

ENGR 3148: Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

Fluid Mechanics experiments will be conducted in conservation principles, viscosity, open channel flow, viscous flow, and gas dynamics. The emphasis of the course is to understand fundamentals through laboratory experiments.

ENGR 3305: Heat Transfer

Study of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include steady and transient conduction, forced and free convection, black body radiation, phase changes, and heat exchange systems.

ENGR 3306: Applications in Heat Transfer

As a follow up course to heat transfer, students are introduced to various applications related to the topic. Applications include design and selection of heat exchanges, refrigeration, heating and cooling of buildings, and cooling of electronic components among others.

ENGR 3310: Mechanical Elements

Application of mechanics principles to machine elements and their design and manufacturing. Topics include selection of mechanical components, material selection, stress and strain analysis, load and power transmission, and failure mechanisms.

ENGR 3330: Electronics I

This course examines the operation and applications of electronic solid-state devices including diodes, operational amplifiers (Op Amps), and transistors (MOSFETs and BJTs) used in electronic devices.

ENGR 3331: Electronics II

As a continuation of ENGR 3330 (Electronics 1), this course examines the operation and applications of electronic solid-state devices including diodes, operational amplifiers (Op Amps), and transistors (MOSFETs and BJTs) used in electronic devices. Simulations and experiments will be incorporated.

ENGR 3333: Electrical Circuits I

Electrical circuits laws and theorems focused on DC circuit analysis. Analysis of resistive, inductive, capacitive, and Operational Amplifier circuits using Kirchhoff Laws, Thevenin equivalent circuits, and other analytical techniques.

ENGR 3334: Microprocessors

This course examines the operation and applications of microprocessors used in digital computing. Topics cover computer hardware and software, programming, computation, interfacing, I/O processing, communication, and data analysis.

ENGR 3335: Thermodynamics

This course focuses on the concepts and applications of thermodynamics. The central objective of this course is to demonstrate the crucial role of thermodynamics in a modern industrialized society. The course concentrates on the following: conservation equations for mass, energy, and entropy in closed and open systems; applications of the first and second laws of thermodynamics to steady-state and transient problems; properties of fluids and equations of state; power generation and refrigeration cycles; chemical and phase equilibrium.

ENGR 3336: Robotics

This course provides an introduction to the interface between electronic and mechanical systems. Topics will cover the fundamentals of mechatronic control systems that allow for automation of tasks such as navigation and manipulation.

ENGR 3337: Multicomponent Thermodynamics

This course introduces students to the principles of multicomponent thermodynamics and their application in chemical engineering. Students will learn how to analyze and design chemical processes involving multiple components using thermodynamic models and principles. The course covers topics such as phase behavior, equilibrium calculations, thermodynamic properties, and the application of thermodynamics in the design of separation processes. Throughout the course, students will be expected to apply their knowledge to real-world problems through case studies and design projects

ENGR 3340: Signals and Systems

This course examines continuous-time signals and systems. It covers the basic continuous signals operations and different systems classifications. Topics include linear time-invariant systems, impulse response, convolution, Fourier analysis, and Filtering.

ENGR 3341: Statics

The concepts of force, moments, balance and friction are used in the application of vector algebra and calculus to the modeling and analysis of force systems, free-body diagrams, and the equilibrium states of rigid bodies.

ENGR 3342: Dynamics

The concepts of force, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum and vibration are used in the application of vector and differential equations for the modeling and analysis of particle kinetics, planar and three-dimensional particle kinematics, and the behavior of rigid bodies.

ENGR 3343: Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering

A survey of mathematical methods used in advanced physics and engineering courses, including linear algebra and linear systems, vector analysis, complex variables, ordinary and partial differential equations, Fourier series, integral transforms, and special functions. Emphasis is on physical applications, using both analytical and computational solutions to problems.

ENGR 3344: Digital Signal Processing

Digital Systems Processing course examines Discrete-time signals and systems. It provides an introduction to time-domain and frequency-domain analysis for linear discrete systems. Topics include sampling, quantization, impulse response, convolution, Z-transform, Discrete Fourier Analysis, and introduction to digital Filters.

ENGR 3345: Electrochemical Energy Systems

This course studies the fundamentals of electrochemical energy storage and materials. It covers basic principles and mathematical models of electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, photoelectrochemistry devices, and energy storage. The main focus of this course is to give the students a solid understanding of the application of these principles in the emerging technologies like lithium-ion batteries, fuel-cells, super-capacitors and solar cells.

ENGR 3346: Electrical Circuits II

Second semester of Electrical circuits course sequence focused on AC circuit analysis. Course includes a treatment of AC circuits analysis, AC power analysis, transfer functions and filters, three-phase circuits, and Laplace transform and Fourier analysis techniques for complex waveforms.

ENGR 3347: Strength of Materials

This course is the study of stresses and insuring for a given geometry and loading case that stresses are maintained below an acceptable level. Stresses discussed include bending stress, shear stress, axial stress, and combined stressed to include Mohr's circle. Design of both beams and columns will be discussed. There is some mention of composite materials and stress concentrations.

ENGR 3348: Fluids

This course provides a basis in conservation principles applied to fluid systems, fluid statistics, dimensional analysis, viscous flow, open channel flow, and an understanding of turbomachinery. One aspect of the course is the use of Excel to solve several nonlinear problems that arise in the study of fluids.

ENGR 3350: Fundamentals of Biomolecular Engineering

Fundamentals of biochemical processes and molecular biology. DNA replication, transcription, translation, recombination technologies, and genetic engineering; design of bioreactors, transport processes and separation of biological materials, and application of enzymes.

ENGR 3352: Transport Phenomena

Fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport relating to chemical engineering. The focus is on topics in conduction, convection, radiation, fluid flow through pipes, mixing flows, and diffusion.

ENGR 4120: Mechanical Engineering Design Capstone Laboratory

This course, in combination with the Engineering Design Capstone course PHYS 4320, is an upper-level capstone treatment of an engineering design project and is executed by a team of students. The project involves application of analytical, experimental and computational techniques to the chosen topic. Topics are chosen from various engineering disciplines according to student and faculty interest. This course is dedicated to the realization of the project.

ENGR 4140: Electrical Machines

This course introduces concepts related to the interplay of electrical and mechanical systems. Topics will include, construction, design and analysis of major types of rotating and linear electric machines such as transformers, induction motors, synchronous motors, alternators and DC motors and generators.

ENGR 4144: Electrical Engineering Capstone Laboratory

This course – in combination with the Electrical Engineering Capstone course ENGR 4344 -is an upper level capstone treatment of an engineering design project from idea over design to realization. The project involves application of analytical, experimental, and computational techniques to the chosen topic from the electrical engineering field according to student and faculty interest and is executed by a team of students. This course is dedicated to the realization of the project designed in the ENGR 4344 course.

ENGR 4156: Chemical Engineering Capstone Laboratory

Capstone design of chemical processes. Included design factors are: health and safety, reliability, sustainability, cost, profitability, efficiency, environmental issues, and optimization. This course is dedicated to the realization of the project designed in the ENGR 4356 course.

ENGR 4300: Chemical Reactors

This course provides an in-depth study of chemical reactors, which are key components in chemical processes that involve chemical reactions. Students will learn the principles of chemical reaction engineering, including reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and reactor design. The course covers different types of reactors, such as batch, continuous stirred-tank, plug-flow, and packed-bed reactors, and their applications in various chemical processes. Students will also learn how to analyze and design chemical reactors based on reaction kinetics, mass and energy balances, and thermodynamic considerations. The course covers additional topics such as catalysts, reactor performance, and safety considerations in chemical reactors.

ENGR 4301: Separation Processes

This course provides an overview of separation processes used in the chemical industry, including distillation, absorption, extraction, adsorption, and membrane separation. Students will learn the principles and applications of different separation processes and their role in the production of various chemicals, such as petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Students will also learn how to design and optimize separation processes based on their specific separation requirements, including the selection of appropriate equipment, the determination of operating conditions, and the evaluation of performance.

ENGR 4302: Chemical Reactors and Separation Processes

Chemical Reactors and Separation Processes aims to equip students with the practical tools needed to apply reaction kinetics and thermodynamics in an industrial setting. Topics covered include: chemical reaction kinetics; homogeneous and catalytic reactions; batch, continuously-stirred, plug-flow, and fixed-bed reactors; thermodynamics and mass transfer of separation processes; distillation; absorption and adsorption; membranes.

ENGR 4303: Analysis and Design of Chemical Processes

Chemical Analysis and Design of Chemical Processes aims to equip students with the practical tools needed to analyze and design a chemical process for the production of commodity chemicals. Topics covered include: process flow diagrams; tracing chemicals through the process flow diagram; process conditions; engineering economic analysis of chemical processes; process control and optimization; process performance; process simulation.

ENGR 4304: Plant Design

This course provides an introduction to the design of chemical plants, including the selection of processes, equipment, and materials, and the integration of these components into a coherent and efficient process. Students will learn the principles and techniques of process design, including process flow diagrams, equipment sizing, and cost estimation. The course covers topics such as safety, environmental considerations, and regulatory compliance in plant design, as well as the economic aspects of plant design, including capital and operating costs, profitability analysis, and risk management.

ENGR 4305: Dynamic Systems and Controls

Mathematical modeling, analysis, measurement, and control of dynamic systems. Topics include physical systems models, introduction to feedback control, time and frequency domain analysis of control systems, stability of linear control systems, PID control, and root-locus analysis. Incorporation of computational software for computer-based controls and modeling is included.

ENGR 4310: Computational Fluid Dynamics

Computational modeling and analysis of fluid flows using finite­difference and finite-volume methods for solving fluid flow model partial differential equations. Additionally covers concepts of stability, consistency, convergence, and solution of large-scale systems of linear equations.

ENGR 4312: Engineering Communications

Practical experience and practice with various modes of engineering and technical communication. Focus will be on written technical documents. A case study in engineering ethics and techniques for oral technical presentations for various audiences will be included as well.

ENGR 4315: Computational Modeling of Materials

Computational modeling is used to analyze materials and systems at multiple scales. Multi-scale modeling begins with first principle calculations at the quantum mechanics level, proceeds to the atomic level, and concludes with the continuum leveL Modeling techniques discussed at each level include: density functional theory, molecular dynamics, and finite element analysis.

ENGR 4320: Mechanical Engineering Design Capstone

This course – in combination with the Engineering Design Laboratory course PHYS 4120 - is an upper level capstone treatment of an engineering design project (from idea over design to realization) and is executed by a team of students. The project involves application of analytical, experimental and computational techniques to the chosen topic. Topics are chosen from various engineering disciplines according to student and faculty interest. This course is dedicated to the idea and design part, the realization of the project will take place in PHYS 4120, the Engineering Design Laboratory.

ENGR 4325: Compressible Flow

Study of compressible flows and related phenomena. Topics include control volume solutions in one and two dimensions, normal and oblique shockwaves, isentropic flow, boundary layers and frictional flow, and nonadiabatic flow.

ENGR 4333: Electromagnetism

Theory and application of electric and magnetic fields and their interactions with matter. Topics include electro- and magnetostatics, dynamics, and Maxwell's Equations with applications to transmission, radiation, and wave propagation. This course incorporates vector analysis and boundary-value problems.

ENGR 4340: Wireless Communications

Wireless Communications covers the basic fundamentals of wireless cellular networks. The course provides an overview of wireless channel models including large-scale and small scale fading effects, multiplexing, signal encoding techniques, error detection and correction, OFDM, spread spectrum, and multiple-input-multiple-output transmission.

ENGR 4341: Electrical Power Systems

Electrical Power Systems introduces electrical power generation and transmission, and the sub-systems involved in this process. Electric power systems have become increasingly utilized to transmit and transform energy for industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems also enable the inclusion of alternative energy sources, such as wind, solar electric, solar thermal, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation into large grids.

ENGR 4342: Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

This course reviews electrostatics and the steady magnetic field, Maxwell’s equations. Applications to wave propagation, transmission lines, and radiation theory are emphasized.

ENGR 4343: Computational Methods for Engineering

An introduction to using computers to study and model physical systems, particularly those problems which are difficult or impossible to solve analytically. The focus is on concrete problems arising in the Engineering industry and Physics fields, using programming languages (e.g. Python, Matlab, C++). Students are expected to design, implement, and verify their own code, as well as incorporate standard code libraries. Topics may include numerical integration, differential equations, linear systems, molecular dynamics, finite-element methods, working with large datasets, graphics and 3d visualization.

ENGR 4344: Electrical Engineering Capstone

This course – in combination with the Electrical Engineering Capstone Laboratory course ENGR 4144 -is an upper level capstone treatment of an engineering design project (from idea over design to realization) and is executed by a team of students. The project involves application of analytical, experimental, and computational techniques to the chosen topic. Topics are chosen from the electrical engineering field according to student and faculty interest. This course is dedicated to the idea and design part, the realization of the project will take place in ENGR 4144, the Electrical Engineering Capstone Laboratory.

ENGR 4354: Transport Processes

Continuation of ENGR 3352 -Transport Phenomena. Design and analysis of heat exchangers, fluid-flow systems, separation processes. Transport in single and multiphase systems.

ENGR 4356: Chemical Engineering Capstone

Capstone design of chemical processes. Included design factors are: health and safety, reliability, sustainability, cost, profitability, efficiency, environmental issues, and optimization. This course is dedicated to the idea and design part, the realization of the project will take place in ENGR 4156, the Chemical Engineering Capstone Laboratory.

ENGR 4360: Properties of Materials

While many courses focus on the importance of stress and strain in engineering analysis, material selection is just as critical for design. This course focuses on processing of materials to achieve variations in material properties, types of engineering materials, and basic testing of materials to determine the material properties.

ENGR 4364: Fundamentals of Nanotechnology

This course will cover fundamental concepts of nanotechnology. After introducing underlying theoretical concepts the relationship between structure, properties (mechanical, electrical, optical, chemical, magnetic), and performance of nanomaterials is investigated. Characterization and fabrication methods, as well as interdisciplinary applications such nanoelectronics, alternative energy production, drug delivery and therapy are discussed.

ENGR 4391: Internship in Engineering

Internship in Engineering offers students the opportunity to explore and develop their careers through professional practice. This course takes place in form of an 8-10 week, full time external internship for individual students in various branches of industry and government agencies. In order to register for the course the Student must show proof to the department that they have successfully obtained an internship and register for the course for the semester in which the internship will be evaluated by UST faculty. Students have to be rising juniors or seniors to qualify for this course. In order to get course credit students have to submit detailed (week by week) documentation regarding their internship goals and achievements and fulfill further course requirements as determined by supervising faculty from the Department of Physics and Engineering.

ENGR 4446: Control Systems and Automation

This course introduces concepts in control theory for the analysis and design of autonomous dynamic systems. It includes the development of advanced control system design concepts such as Nyquist analysis; lead-lag compensation; state feedback; parameter sensitivity; controllability; observability; introduction to non-linear and modern control.